April 7, 2020

Earth Week Night I Spy (4-7-2020)

by Chompers

Background show artwork for Chompers

Get ready to travel around the earth on today’s I Spy!

Transcript

Welcome back! It’s time for Chompers, your morning and night toothbrushing show. 


Start brushing on the top of your mouth, and brush the inside, outside and chewing side of each tooth. 


3, 2, 1 Brush! 


It’s Earth Week, and tonight we’ve got more I Spies for you. We’ll describe something, and you get to guess what it is! 


Here’s your first one: 


I’m in a gigantic and beautiful piece of land that crosses the American states of Montana, Idaho AND Wyoming. I see a river stream that flows through a lake, large mountains, and geysers. I see bison far away, and swans and elk and sheep by the river.


Where am I? 


Find out after you switch your brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth but don’t brush too hard.


[Switch Bell]


I am in...


YELLOWSTONE!


Yellowstone was one of the first national parks in the world. There are now hundreds of National Parks across the world. A national park is a land where animals and plants are protected from human activities. 


National Parks are very important to the conservation of our environment - they not only protect plants and animals, but they also help keep water and air clean.


Switch to the bottom of your mouth, and brush the inside, outside and chewing side of each tooth.


[Switch Bell]


Here’s another I Spy:  


I’m sailing across the Pacific Ocean, halfway between Hawaii and California. And the water which was clean and dark blue for a while, is now spotted with plastic bits floating around. 


What do I spy? Shout it out: 


THE GREAT PACIFIC GARBAGE PATCH!


Switch your brushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth, and don’t forget the molars in the back.


[Switch Bell]


A garbage patch is an area of the ocean where lots of litter collects, floating on the ocean surface. It’s mostly made of plastic waste, like fishing gear. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the largest patch of waste. Scientists think it could weigh something like 80,000 tons. That’s like more than 10 thousand elephants floating in the ocean.


And I don’t want to trash talk but it’s a big waste when you think about all this plastic could have been recycled! 


That’s it for Chompers tonight, but come back tomorrow for more earthy nerdy facts!


Until then, rinse before you…


 3, 2, 1 spit!